US Auctions will be closely monitored this week!

On February 25th, the Treasury auctioned 7-year notes. It did not go well.

FED 7

This week, the US Treasury will be auctioning off the following:

  • Tuesday: 3-year notes
  • Wednesday:  10-year notes
  • Thursday:  30-year bonds

In addition, the Treasury will also be issuing a few short-term duration bills (less than 1 year).  There is also a good deal of corporate bond supply this week.  

Recall on February 25th when the Treasury auctioned 7-year notes.  It did not go well.  As a result, bond prices moved lower (on less demand) and yields moved higher (yields move inversely to bond prices):

5-Year Yields


Source: Tradingview, FOREX.com

10-Year Yields


Source: Tradingview, FOREX.com

Terms to know for the auction:

In addition to yields (which should be compared the previous auctions) There are several data points released after the results of the auctions are made available (usually a few minutes after 1:00pm ET).  However, there are two important ones to pay attention to in order to determine if an auction went well:

1)      Bid-to-Cover (from Investopedia): the dollar amount of bids received vs the amount of Treasury securities sold.  Bid-to-Cover ratios typically exceed 2.0.  A successful bid-to-ratio should substantially exceed the average of the 12 previous ones.  A low ratio is an indication of a poor auction. 

*The bid-to-cover from the 7-year auction on February 25h was 2.045, the lowest on record

2)      Indirect vs Direct bidders (from Investopedia): An indirect bidder, commonly a foreign entity) bids throughs another party.  A direct bidder purchases the Treasuries during the auction for themselves or their house account.   Indirect bidders are often used as a proxy for demand by foreign investors.

*In the 7-year auction on February 25th, only 38.06% of the bidders were indirect bidders.  This left direct bidders (mainly primary dealers) taking away the balance of the auction.

Market Reaction:  With the weak 7-year auction on February 25th, the markets sold bonds, sold stocks, and bought US Dollars ( as yields went higher).  Traders could expect a similar reaction this week if they auctions are poor.  Therefore, US Dollar counter currencies should move lower verse the US Dollar if results are poor.

Learn more about forex trading opportunities.

Disclaimer: The information on this web site is not targeted at the general public of any particular country. It is not intended for distribution to residents in any country where such distribution or use would contravene any local law or regulatory requirement. The information and opinions in this report are for general information use only and are not intended as an offer or solicitation with respect to the purchase or sale of any currency or CFD contract. All opinions and information contained in this report are subject to change without notice. This report has been prepared without regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any particular recipient. Any references to historical price movements or levels is informational based on our analysis and we do not represent or warranty that any such movements or levels are likely to reoccur in the future. While the information contained herein was obtained from sources believed to be reliable, author does not guarantee its accuracy or completeness, nor does author assume any liability for any direct, indirect or consequential loss that may result from the reliance by any person upon any such information or opinions.

Futures, Options on Futures, Foreign Exchange and other leveraged products involves significant risk of loss and is not suitable for all investors. Losses can exceed your deposits. Increasing leverage increases risk. Spot Gold and Silver contracts are not subject to regulation under the U.S. Commodity Exchange Act. Contracts for Difference (CFDs) are not available for US residents. Before deciding to trade forex and commodity futures, you should carefully consider your financial objectives, level of experience and risk appetite. Any opinions, news, research, analyses, prices or other information contained herein is intended as general information about the subject matter covered and is provided with the understanding that we do not provide any investment, legal, or tax advice. You should consult with appropriate counsel or other advisors on all investment, legal, or tax matters. References to Forex.com or GAIN Capital refer to GAIN Capital Holdings Inc. and its subsidiaries. Please read Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options.