Saudi Arabia

Stay in step with market opportunities and get insights, actionable trade ideas and dedicated support.

  • Newest
  • Popular
Feature image of stock market figures and indices

Saudi Arabia throw Western allies a bone with potential output increase

Crude oil has fallen over 2.7% today on reports that Saudi Arabia may be prepared to raise oil production should Russian output substantially fall.

Energy

OIL MARKET WEEK AHEAD: Saudi Imports Drop to a Record Low

During the first two weeks of June only one Saudi cargo ship reached the US

default avatar
June 26, 2020 03:00 PM
Energy

OIL MARKET WEEK AHEAD: At Long Last, A Recovery in Demand?

The end of the lockdown is fundamentally spelling a recovery in demand that is likely to go on over the weeks ahead

default avatar
June 19, 2020 03:07 PM

Why trade with FOREX.com?

Tight spreads from 0.5 pts on FX and 1 pt on indices.


Award-winning platforms with fast and secure execution.

Course thumbnail of FOREX.com course:  What are commodities by FOREX.com

Crude oil regains poise

Crude prices have been able to recoup a big chunk of the losses they suffered on Monday afternoon. At the time of this writing, Brent oil was trading at $51.60 a barrel, a good $1 better off compared to the low hit on Monday, while WTI was trading at $50.75, likewise $1 higher from its corresponding low.

Oil higher ahead of OPEC decision

Crude prices jumped in reaction to the latest weekly US crude stockpiles data but then quickly went into reverse gear, before bouncing back once again. Traders were in no mood to take any chances ahead of the conclusion of talks between the OPEC and non-OPEC members in Algeria, especially given how headline-driven prices have become.

Saudi oil output offer report lifts Brent for fourth day

Ahead of next week’s talks in Algeria, Reuters reported this morning that Saudi Arabia is apparently willing to reduce its oil output for as long as Iran agrees to freeze its production at current levels.

Crude oil rebounds from critical price level

Since Friday, the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) US benchmark for crude oil has been rebounding from a critical price juncture around the $43 level. This rise has been driven primarily by tentative hopes for an agreement among Russia, Saudi Arabia, and potentially other OPEC members to limit oil production in the interest of steadying crude prices. Also helping to boost crude oil in the past few days has been a weaker US dollar, which has been pressured by diminished expectations of a September Fed rate hike due to a string of relatively weak US economic data since late last week.

Another crude roller-coaster ride for oil traders

North American investors are away in observance of the Labor Day. Understandably, it has been a quiet day in FX, bond and stock markets. But for one particular market, it has been an exceptionally volatile day. Crude oil took a roller coaster ride, rising nearly 5% this morning before giving up much of those gains.

Crude trims losses after freeze deal collapse

Sunday’s meeting of crude producers in Doha ended without any agreement to curb oil production. The reaction of oil prices has been logical: a six per cent gap down at the open overnight. Oil prices have since rebounded strongly off their lows, in part due to short covering. Clearly, many people were surprised that after so much talk, a 'freeze' deal, which had looked imminent last week, failed to materialise. At the end, Saudi Arabia’s position to maintain market share was the reason talks collapsed as it wanted all major non-US producers – in other words, Iran – to be part of any freeze deal. But I wonder how such a deal would have changed the fundamentals in any way. As Oman's oil minister said, many oil producers with the exception of a few such as Iran are already at peak production capacity anyway. A deal to freeze oil production at these peak levels would therefore not have helped to immediately reduce the supply glut significantly quicker than would be the case now. In fact, one could argue that by maintaining the status quo and with oil prices being notably higher than back in January and February, there was less motivation for the Saudis to compromise as they can afford to play out their strategy of driving weaker US shale oil producers out of business. Now that US oil output is finally responding to the significantly weaker oil prices, the market can, over time, re-balance itself anyway without the need of intervention from the OPEC and Russia.  That being said however, a deal to freeze production could have sped up the rebalancing process slightly.

Open an account in minutes

Experience award-winning platforms with fast and secure execution, and enjoy tight spreads from 0.5 pts on FX and 1 pt on indices.

Trading view chart close-up